DCommander or Commander One. Which one is better?


Working with loads of files requires a lot of time and effort. To keep you from getting dizzy from all the moving and copying and organizing a reliable file manager is a must. When you start your search on the web, you'll find plenty of options, but are they any good? How do you know which one will suit your needs and is a reliable professional solution with dedicated tech support and regular updates? The right file manager will support all connections you are going to work with, will be easily adjustable to your working style, and of course will be totally worth the price you are paying for the license.

Commander One

Compare Commander One with another dual-panel file manager DCommander

Commander One is written in Swift and offers an easy way of managing multiple files. It works with local drives as well as with network. You can make the hidden files show and when you don't need those, just hide them again with a neat switch. DCommander also positions itself as a Mac alternative for Total Commander and has a dual-pane interface. Its website is basically a feature list, so it will be easy to compare even though not much background is available.

DCommander promises smooth FTP and SCP connections, sorting of the files and folders by various parameters, offers tabs and show/hide hidden files option. DCommander doesn't offer support for many popular connections like FTPS, FTPES, FXP Copy, Dropbox, Google Drive, Amazon S3, WebDAV servers, Microsoft OneDrive, MTP, iOS. Commander One supports all of the above mentioned except for FXP Copy and SCP at this time.

In Commander One all processes are queued in the background where you can easily manage their order and overview their statuses. Commander One also offers an unlimited number of tabs in each panel, various view modes, remote and local drives access, and supports RegEx search, etc. Note that DCommander does not support search with RegEx.

Commander One PRO has the Process Viewer where you can see and, if needed, quit the running processes on your machine. DCommander does not offer a Process Viewer. Same situation with Terminal emulation. Commander One features its own Terminal emulator for faster file operations without having to leave the app, while DCommander doesn't have one. Currently Commander One doesn't offer file and folder comparison, neither does DCommander. The latter app however features folder synchronization, while Commander One can't do it but promises to add this option in the future releases. Commander One can sort by 5 parameters, while DCommander offers sorting by 6 different parameters. Neither app offers hex editor at this time.

Personalization is important for comfortable work process. In Commander One you can create custom hotkeys for any action and customize context menu. DCommander doesn't offer these personalization features. Both apps offer themes.

Working with compressed folders is important we think. Commander One offers complete support for ZIP, 7zip, TAR (bz/gz/z/xz) archives and RAR in read-only mode. Additionally it works with IPA, APK, JAR, CAB, ISO types. Only ZIP files are fully supported by DCommander, while 7zip, TAR (bz/gz/z/xz) and RAR are not supported at all. DCommander also works with JAR files, but that's it. Commander One can work with compressed folders just as if they were regular ones.

Commander One is a free file manager for Mac OS X. You can also opt for purchasing a PRO version for more advanced possibilities. DCommander offers free 30-day trial version and then you'll have to buy a license.

Commander One
Requirements: OS X 10.10+ , 37.64MB size
Version 2.4(3129) (19th Nov, 2019) Release notes
Category: Utilities